Blog Archives

Q: What kind of art do you create?

At work

At work

A:  I live in the West Village in New York City and have been a working artist for thirty-four years. I create original pastel paintings that use my large collection of Mexican and Guatemalan folk art – masks, carved wooden animals, papier mache figures, and toys – as subject matter. Blending with my fingers, I spend months painstakingly applying dozens of layers of soft pastel onto acid-free sandpaper. My self-invented technique achieves extraordinarily rich, vibrant color and results in paintings that uniquely combine reality, fantasy, and autobiography. Please see https://barbararachko.art/en/

For the last three years I have been working on a series called, “Bolivianos,” based on an exhibition of Carnival masks seen in La Paz. Art critics and others have said that these are my strongest pastel paintings so far. As I write I am working on the fifteenth piece in the series.  

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  Amidst the noisy construction happening next door,  I continue slowly working on “Jokester” (tentative title), soft pastel on sandpaper, 58” x 38.”  I’ve just begun to add stripes into the shirt.

It is the fifteenth piece in the “Bolivianos” series.  Read more about this work at https://barbararachko.art/en/paintings/bolivianos

Comments are welcome!

Q: Travel is an essential aspect of your work. How do you decide where to travel next?

In the Bolivian Andes at about 14,000’

In the Bolivian Andes at about 14,000’

 A:  Generally, I am most interested in exploring Mexico and destinations in Central and South American because they offer endless inspiration to further my work.  I’m not exactly certain why this is the case.  I DO know that I cannot get enough of travel to points south!

My 2017 trip to Bolivia proved to be crucial for my current pastel painting series.  “Bolivianos” is based on an exhibition of Carnival masks encountered at the National Museum of Ethnology and Folklore in La Paz.

I had high hopes of making a return visit – along with a private tour guide – last February.  However, since President Moreno resigned last November, much political instability, violence, and turmoil resulted.  I would not have felt safe traveling to Oruro to see Carnival celebrations this year.

In the mean time I look forward to traveling to Chile, the Atacama Desert, and Easter Island next winter!

Comnents are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I’m working on a 26” x 20” pastel painting that will be number 14 in the “Bolivianos” series.  This is very early in the process.

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I’m at the beginning on a small (26” x 20”) pastel painting.  The subject is a jaguar mask I photographed in La Paz.  This is painting number eleven in the “Bolivianos” series.  Lots of green colored dust now!

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue working on the latest in the “Bolivianos” series, “Poseur,” Soft Pastel on Sandpaper, 58” x 38.”  I haven’t decided yet whether to put a pattern on the fabric.

Comments are welcome!

Q: In the “Bolivianos” series you are exclusively depict masks. What drew you to them?

Source material for “The Champ”

Source material for “The Champ”

A:  For me a mask is so much more than a mask.  It is a living thing with its own mind, its own soul, and with a unique history.  With this series I feel as though I am creating portraits of living beings.  

These images are a return to my early days because I began as a photo-realist portrait painter.  So I am reconnecting with a first love, except with a welcome twist.  This time I do not have to satisfy a portrait client’s request to make my subject look younger or more handsome.  I am free to respond only to what the work needs. 

Comments are welcome!     

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Preliminary charcoal sketch in progress.

Preliminary charcoal sketch in progress.

A:  I am starting a new preliminary sketch for my next pastel painting.  This will be number nine in the “Bolivianos” series!  

In 2018 I made six new pastel paintings, which is more than usual.  The last time I created six in one year was 1996!

Comments are welcome! 

Q: What more would you wish to bring to your work?

Tile worker in South India

Tile worker in South India

A:  I tend to follow wherever the work leads, rather than directing it.  I have never been able to predict where it will lead or what more might be added.

Travel is essential for inspiration.  Besides many Mexican sojourns, I have been to Bali, Sri Lanka, South India, Guatemala, Honduras, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Paraguay, and other places.  A second trip to India is upcoming, to Gujarat and Rajistan this time.  

Last year I had the opportunity to go to Bolivia. In La Paz I visited the Museum of Ethnography and Folklore, where a stunning mask exhibition was taking place.  As soon as I saw it, I knew this would be the inspiration for my next series, “Bolivianos.”  So far I have completed six “Bolivianos” pastel paintings with two more in progress now.  This work is getting a lot of press and several critics have declared it to be my strongest series yet.

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Preliminary sketch

Preliminary sketch

A:  I’m working on a preliminary charcoal drawing for my next large pastel painting.  It will be number seven in the “Bolivianos” series.

Comments are welcome!

%d bloggers like this: