Category Archives: Art Works in Progress

What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  This is my fourth day working on a small (26”x 20”) pastel painting.  All of these colors are going to change over the next few months.

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue slowly working on a 58” x 38” pastel painting.  For now I’ve added a small figure on the right.  I’m not sure yet whether I’ll keep it.

Comments are welcome!

Q: How do you feel about donating your work to auctions?

Studio with work in progress

Studio with work in progress

A:  Generally, it depends on who is doing the asking.  If it’s an organization that has been supportive of my work, I am pleased to help with fundraising.  If the organization and I have never connnected before, their out-of-the-blue request sometimes feels disrespectful.  Artists invest decades, vast amounts of money, and plenty of blood, sweat, and tears to become the skilled creators that we are.  And a New York artist’s overhead is considerable.  I know of no artists who create their hard-fought work only to give it away. 

Under certain conditions, however, I will participate.  Here is my response to a recent donation request.  

Dear…

Thank you for contacting me.  Certainly your organization sounds worthwhile.

However, you may be unaware that artists may deduct ONLY the cost of materials when we give our work to auctions.  I suggest that you ask one of your supporters to buy a pastel painting and donate it next year (there is a one-year waiting period for collectors to take this tax deduction).  Then we have a win-win-win!  I get paid, the collector/donor gets to enjoy owning my beautiful work for a year AND take a tax deduction for the full amount that he/she paid for it.  Plus, your organization gets to sell my painting at next year’s auction.

Don’t you agree this is a better approach for everyone involved?

Sincerely…

 

Comments are welcome!   

  

   

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue working on “Acolytes,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38” x 58.”  It’s slow going at this stage as I refine my drawing and bring everything to a high state of finish.  My work is all about details.

Comments are welcome!

My blog turns 6 years old tomorrow! Here is the very first post from July 15, 2012. Q: What does it take to be an artist, especially one living and working in New York?

Barbara's Studio

Barbara’s Studio with works in progress.

A:  The three Big P’s – Patience, Persistence, and Passion.  Without all three you will not have the stamina to work tirelessly for very little external reward.  You can expect help from no one. 

There are so many obstacles to art-making and countless reasons to just give up.  When you really think about it, it’s amazing that great art gets made at all.  So why do we do it?  Above all it’s about making our time on earth matter, about devotion to our innate gifts and love of our hard-fought creative process. 

And, my God, it even gets harder as we get older!  So what do we do?  We dig in that much deeper.  It’s a most noble and sacred calling – you know when you have it – and that’s what separates those of us who are in it for the long haul from the wimps, fakers, and hangers-on.  I say to my fellow artists who continue to work despite the endless challenges, we are all true heroes! 

__________

Lucky me to still be in the same studio!  However, when you visit now, you see more tables full of pastels, more postcards on the walls, newer pastel paintings, etc.  More importantly, what I wrote six years ago still rings true! 

Comments are welcome!     

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue working on “Acolytes,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38” x 58.”

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Preliminary sketch

Preliminary sketch

A:  I’m working on a preliminary charcoal drawing for my next large pastel painting.  It will be number seven in the “Bolivianos” series.

Comments are welcome!

Start/Finish of “Shamanic,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26″ x 20”

Start

Start

Finish

Finish

This one was tough going, but finally it’s ready for the framer!

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue working on a large pastel painting based on another of my photographs from La Paz, Bolivia.

Comments are welcome!

Q: You have spoken about your pastel technique, which involves layering pigments on top of each other, up to 25 to 30 layers. When you do this are you putting the same colors on top of each other?

 

An early version of "Oracle," 26" x 20"

An early version of “Oracle,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26″ x 20″

Finished

Finished

A:  I do layer Rembrandt black soft pastels on top of each other to achieve the dark backgrounds in my “Black Paintings” and “Bolivianos” series.  Black Rembrandts are the pastels I use most so I order them several dozen at a time.  The 400 or 500 grit sandpaper requires at least four layers of pastel just to achieve even coverage.  Over the next few months I add many more layers of black pastel to achieve the final rich look.

The figures and shapes in each pastel painting are a different  story.  Were you to x-ray them, you’d see many different colors underneath the final one.  Sometimes subsequent colors are closely related to earlier ones.  With each additional layer, I correct, refine, and strengthen my drawing so the objects depicted become more solid and/or three-dimensional.

In addition to the thousands of pastels I have to choose from, I mix and blend new colors directly on the sandpaper.  As I proceed, I am searching for the ‘best’ colors, those that make the overall painting more resonant, more alive, and more exciting to look at.  Of course, this is wholly subjective.

Comments are welcome!