Category Archives: Studio

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  Progress is slower than usual during the current pandemic lockdown.  I continue working on “Trickster,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26” x 20.”

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 400

In the studio with friends

In the studio with friends

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

A student in the audience raised her hand and asked me:

“Why should I live?”

… In the very act of asking that question, you are seeking reasons for your convictions, and so you are committed to reason as the means to discover and justify what is important to you.  And there are so many reasons to live!

As a sentient being, you have the potential to flourish.  You can refine your faculty of reason itself by learning and debating.  You can seek explanations of the natural world through science, and insight into the human condition through the arts and humanities.  You can make the most of your capacity for pleasure and satisfaction, which allowed your ancestors to thrive and thereby allowed you to exist.  You can appreciate the beauty and the richness of the natural and cultural world.  As the heir to billions of years of life perpetuating itself, you can perpetuate life in turn.  You have been endowed with a sense of sympathy – the ability to like , love, respect, help, and show kindness – and you can enjoy the gift of mutual benevolence with friends, family, and colleagues.

And because reason tells you that none of this is particular to you, you have the responsibility to provide to others what you expect for yourself.  You can foster the welfare of other sentient beings by enhancing life, health, knowledge, freedom, abundance, safety, beauty, and peace.  History shows that when we sympathize with others and apply our ingenuity to improving the human condition, we can make progress in doing so, and you can help to continue that progress.

Stephen Pinker in Enlightenment Now:  The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress 

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  For nearly two weeks this pastel painting, “Majordomo,” has been on “pause” due to the corona virus.  I’m able to work on it now sporadically.

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 396

Barbara’s Studio

Barbara’s Studio

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

To summarize, art is expression. Expression is nonutilitarian and has no purpose beyond itself.  Early on this led me to define works of art as things whose only function is to be perceived.  Since the appearance of such things in everyday life breaks the drift of habit for which we have been hard-wired by evolution, art always occurs as an interruption.  In the course of time, humans have produced innumerable works of art, subordinating them to innumerable ends according to the needs of the hour, yet all art exhibits a primal quality that exceeds those appropriations.  Because the inherent multivalence of art threatens the desire to reduce things to clear significations, human societies have a tendency to overlook it, with the result that a great many aesthetic objects are called art when they are perhaps something else.  To clarify this distinction I called art designed to serve instrumental reason “artifice.”  In its worst forms, artifice amounts to aesthetic manipulation of a kind that is indisputably hostile to the ideals of openness, plurality, freedom of thought, and rational disclosure that we were told were the cornerstones of modernity.  Art, on the other hand, is innately emancipatory, being itself the affirmation or sign of freedom.     

J.F. Martel in Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice:  A Treatise, Critique, and Call to Action

Comments are welcome!

Start/Finish of “Avenger,” Soft Pastel on Sandpaper, 58″ x 38″

Start

Start

Finished and signed lower right

Finished and signed lower right

Comments are welcome!

 

Q: What do you enjoy most about being an artist?

With “Majordomo,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 20” x 26”

With “Majordomo,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 20” x 26”

A: This is a question I enjoy revisiting every so often because life as an artist does not get easier; just the opposite, in fact.  Visual artists tend to be “one man bands.”  We do it all notwithstanding the fact that everything gets harder as we get older.  So it’s good to be reminded about what makes all the sacrifice and hard work worthwhile.

There are so many things to enjoy!  I make my own schedule, set my own tasks, and follow new interests wherever they may  lead.  I am curious about everything and am rarely bored.  I continually push my pastel technique and strive to become a better artist.  There is still so much to learn!  

My relationship with collectors is another perk.  I love to see pastel paintings hanging on collectors’ walls, especially when they’re newly installed and the owners are excited to take possession.  This means that the piece has found a good home, that years of hard work have come full circle!  And it’s often the start of a long friendship.  After living with my pastel paintings for years, collectors tell me they see new details never noticed before and they appreciate the work more than ever.  It’s extremely gratifying to have built a network of supportive art-loving friends around the country.  I’m sure most artists would say the same!

Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  “Majordomo,” 20” x 26,” soft pastel on sandpaper, is coming along.  After today’s studio session, I will put it aside and add finishing details when I am able to see it fresh again.  I‘ve been looking at this piece too long to know what else it needs now.

Comments are welcome!

Start/Finish of “Schemer,” Soft Pastel on Sandpaper, 26” x 20”

Start

Start

Finish

Finish

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 390

In the studio. Photo: Izzy Nova

In the studio. Photo: Izzy Nova

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

What made their work so unique and brilliant was that intangible element – self.  Great painting, great art in general, is not about materials used or methods mastered or even talent possessed.  It is a combination of all of these factors, and an individual driven by a force that seems outside them, toward expression of an idea they often do not understand.   

Mary Gabriel in Ninth Street Women

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 389

Henri Roche pastels: nine trays (four at the top, five on the bottom).

Henri Roche pastels: nine trays (four at the top, five on the bottom).

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Color vision must be universal.  The human eye and brain work the same way for nearly all people as a property of their being human – determining that we all see blue.  But the color lexicon, meaning not merely the particular words but also the specific chromatic space they are said to mark, clearly has been shaped by the particularities of culture.  Since the spectrum of visible colors is a seamless continuum, where one color is thought to stop and another begun is arbitrary.  The lexical discrimination of particular segments is conventional rather than natural.  Physiology determines what we see; culture determines how we name, describe, and understand it.  The sensation of color is physical; the perception of color is cultural.

David Scott Kastan in On Color

Comments are welcome

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