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Pearls from artists* # 292

"White Star," soft pastel on sandpaper, 38" x 58"

“White Star,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38″ x 58″

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

… many tools may share qualities of fine design with works of art.  We are in the presence of a work of art only when it has no preponderant instrumental use, and when its technical and rational foundations are not pre-eminent.  When the technical organization or the rational order of a thing overwhelms our attention, it is an object of use.  On this point Lodoli anticipated the doctrine of functionalists of our century when he declared in the eighteenth century that only the necessary is beautiful.  Kant, however, more correctly said on the same point that the necessary cannot be judged beautiful, but only right or consistent.  In short, a work of art is as useless as a tool is useful.  Works of art are as unique and irreplaceable as tools are common and expendable. 

George Kubler in The Shape of Time:  Remarks on the History of Things

Comments are welcome! 

Pearls from artists* # 291

"The Sovereign," soft pastel on sandpaper, 58" x 38"

“The Sovereign,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 58″ x 38″ image, 70″ x 50″ framed

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Intuitively, we must be truthful to our vision, our conception.  Intellectually, we must concentrate on importance.  In other words, let us be no all-eater, no all-reader, no all-believer, let us be selective instead of being curious.

… Quality in art is more permanent than any propaganda associated with it.

Joseph Albers in Truthfulness in Art iJoseph Albers in Mexico, edited by Lauren Hinkson

Comments are welcome! 

 

 

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I continue slowly working on “Shaman,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26” x 20”.  A long-time aficionado of psychological thrillers, horror, and sci-fi films, I have a high tolerance for the macabre.  However, I admit that this one is a little creepy, considering those are snakes curling around the eyes.  On a deep level this piece is about facing my own fears.  The snakes have become metaphors.

Comments are welcome!

Q: Please speak about how the three pastel paintings series that you have created interrelate.

"The Orator," soft pastel on sandpaper, 38" x 58"

“The Orator,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38″ x 58″

A:  The Black Paintings series of pastel-on-sandpaper paintings grew directly from an earlier series, Domestic Threats.  While both use cultural objects as surrogates for human beings acting in mysterious, highly-charged narratives, in the Black Paintings I replaced all background details of my actual setup (furniture, rugs, etc.) with lush black pastel.  In this work the ‘actors’ are front and center.

While traveling in Bolivia last spring, I visited a mask exhibition at the National Museum of Ethnography and Folklore in La Paz.  The masks were presented against black walls, were spot-lit, and looked eerily like 3D versions of my Black Paintings.  I immediately knew I had stumbled upon a gift.  So  far I have completed three pastel paintings in the Bolivianos series.  Two more are in progress now.

All of my pastel paintings are an example of a style called “contemporary conceptual realism” in which things are not quite as innocent as they seem.  Each painting is a Trojan horse.  There is plenty of backstory to my images, although I usually prefer not to over-explain them.  Much is to be said for mystery in art.  

The world I depict is that of the imagination and this realm owes little debt to the natural world.  Recently, at an art talk I was reminded how fascinating it is to learn how others respond to my work.  As New York art critic Gerrit Henry once remarked, “What we bring to a Rachko… we get back, bountifully.” 

Comments are welcome!

 

Pearls from artists* # 289

“Danzante,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38” x 58”, in progress

“Danzante,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38” x 58”, in progress

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

I do not think it the business of a poet to become a guru.  It is his business to write poetry, and to do that he must remain open and vulnerable.  We grow through relationships of every kind, but most of all through a relationship that takes the whole person.  And it would be pompous and artificial to make an arbitrary decision to shut the door.

The problem is to keep a balance, not to fall to pieces.  In keeping her balance in her last years Louise Bogan stopped writing poems, or nearly.  It was partly, I feel sure, that the detachment demanded of the critic (and especially his absorption in analyzing the work of others) is diametrically opposed to the kind of detachment demanded of the poet in relationship to his own work.  We are permitted to become detached only after the shock of an experience has been taken in, allowed to “happen” in the deepest sense.  Detachment comes with examining the experience by means of writing the poem.      

May Sarton in Journal of a Solitude: The intimate diary of a year in the life of a creative woman

Comments are welcome!

Start/Finish of “Oracle,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26″ x 20″

Start

Start

Finish

Finish

 Comments are welcome!

Q: What’s on the easel today?

Finished and signed

Finished and signed

A:  I have finally finished “Oracle,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26” x 20.”  It’s the third piece in my “Bolivianos” series. 

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 281

"Poker Face," soft pastel on sandpaper, 38" x 58"

“Poker Face,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38″ x 58″

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Interviewer:  Do you think criticism helps any?

Capote: Before publication, and if provided by persons whose judgment you trust, yes, of course criticism helps.  But after something is published, all I want to hear is praise.  Anything less is a bore, and I’ll give you fifty dollars if you produced a writer who can honestly say he was ever helped by the prissy carpings and condescensions of reviewers.  I don’t mean to say  that none of the professional critics are worth paying attention to – but few of the good ones review on a regular basis.  Most of all, I believe in hardening yourself against opinion.  I’ve had, and continue to receive, my full share of abuse, some of it extremely personal, but it doesn’t faze me any more.  I can read the most outrageous libel about myself and never skip a pulsebeat.  And in this connection there is one piece of advice I strongly urge:  never demean yourself by talking back to a critic, never.  Write those letters to the editor in your head, but don’t put them on paper.       

Truman Capote in Writers at Work:  The Paris Review Interviews First Series, edited, and with an introduction by Malcolm Crowley

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 280

"Palaver,"soft pastel on sandpaper, 26" x 20"

“Palaver,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26″ x 20″

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

What is the task?  To compose a work that communicates on several levels, as in a parable, devoid of the stain of cleverness.

What is the  dream?  To write something fine, that would be better than I am, and that would justify my trials and indiscretions.  To offer proof, through a scramble of words, that God exists.

Who do I write?  My finger, as a stylus, traces the question in the blank air.  A familiar riddle posed since youth, withdrawing from play, comrades and the valley of love, girded with words, a beat outside.

Why do we write?  A chorus erupts.

Because we cannot simply live. 

Patti Smith in Devotion

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 279

"Offering," soft pastel on sandpaper, 20" x 26"

“Offering,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 20″ x 26″

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Why is one compelled to write?  To set oneself apart, cocooned, rapt in solitude, despite the wants of others.  Virginia Woolf had her room.  Proust his shuttered windows.  Marguerite Duras her muted house.  Dylan Thomas his modest shed.  All seeking an emptiness to imbue with words.  The words that will penetrate virgin territority, crack unclaimed combinations, articulate the infinite. The words that formed Lolita, The Lover, Our Lady of the Flowers.  

There are stacks of notebooks that speak of years of aborted efforts, deflated euphoria, a relentless pacing of the boards.  We must write, engaging in a myriad of struggles, as if breaking in a willful foal.  We must write, but not without consistent effort and a measure of sacrifice:  to channel the future, to revisit childhood, and to rein in the follies and horrors of the imagination for a pulsating race of readers. 

Patti Smith in Devotion

Comments are welcome!