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Pearls from artists* # 320

"Offering," soft pastel on sandpaper, 20" x 26"

“Offering,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 20″ x 26″

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

As soon as I use words and actions to convey an emotion, I engage with the world, pitting my feelings against fate in hopes of a desired outcome.  If I am angry, my anger is directed at someone or something.  If I am in love, my love is for another.  Feelings are purposive in ordinary reality, our emotional states tangled in the processes of life.  This is what we mean when we refer to ourselves as subjects.  But if, instead of acting on a feeling, I make it the basis of a song or a film or a dance, something strange happens.  My purposive feeling leaves the closed circle of my personal existence, almost as though I had taken it out of historical time altogether.  Transposed into the work of art, it becomes nonpurposive, undirected.  It disassociates from its original focus, and from my self as subject, acquires a kind of autonomy.  Artistic creation allows for the subjective aspect of our lives normally locked inside our skulls to exist outside us, which is to say that in art, the subjective becomes objective.   

J.F. Martel in Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice:  A Treatise, Critique, and Call to Action 

Comments are welcome!

Q: How important are the titles of your pastel paintings?

"Provocateur," soft pastel on sandpaper, 26" x 20"

“Provocateur,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 26″ x 20″

A:  I’d say they are important.  Titles serve mainly as “a way in” for viewers, giving some clues about my thought processes while I am making a painting.  Usually titles emerge only after I have been working on a painting for weeks or months.  For me they are very much like mementos after a very interesting journey.       

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 131

Self-portrait at an architect's estate in Sri Lanka

Self-portrait at an architect’s estate in Sri Lanka

 

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Sister Corita

Immaculate Heart College Art Department Rules

Rule 1:    Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for a while.

Rule 2:    General duties of a student:  pull everything out of your teacher.  Pull everything out of your fellow students.

Rule 3:    General duties of a teacher:  Pull everything out of your students.

Rule 4:    Consider everything an experiment.

Rule 5:    Be self-disciplined.  This means finding someone wise or smart and choosing to follow them.  To be disciplined is to follow in a good way.  To be self-disciplined is to follow in a better way.

Rule 6:    Nothing is a mistake.  There’s no win and no fail.  There’s only make.

Rule 7:    The only rule is work.  If you work it will lead to something.  It’s the people who do all of the work all of the time who eventually catch on to things.

Rule 8:    Don’t try to create and analyze at the same time.  They’re different processes.

Rule 9:    Be happy whenever you can manage it.  Enjoy yourself.  It’s lighter than you think.

Rule 10:  “We’re breaking all the rules.  Even our own rules. And how do we do that?  By leaving plenty of room for X quantities.”  John Cage

Helpful Hints:  Always be around.  Come or go to everything.  Always go to classes.  Read anything you can get your hands on.  Look at movies carefully, often.  Save everything – it might come in handy later.

There should be new rules next week.    

Quoted in The Art Life:  On Creativity and Career by Stuart Horodner

Comments are welcome!