Blog Archives

Q: In January you traveled to south India to study ancient Hindu temples. Would you share some photographs from your trip?

A:  Yes, I spent three weeks in south India.  Having embarked from brown and gray New York City in winter, I was quite stunned by all of the gorgeous color.  Since I already posted many photos onto my Facebook and Pinterest pages (see links on sidebar), I will focus on Madurai, perhaps the most photogenic city I visited.

Tirumalai Nayaka Palace, Madurai

Tirumalai Nayaka Palace, Madurai

Tirumalai Nayaka Palace, Madurai

Tirumalai Nayaka Palace, Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Madurai

Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Outside Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Outside Meenaksi Sundaresvarar Temple, Madurai

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 40

Balinese boy in Hindu dress

Balinese boy in Hindu dress

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

A film is a succession of snapshots more or less posed, and it only very rarely gives us the illusion of the unexpected and rare.  Ninety films out of a hundred are merely interminable poses.  One doesn’t premeditate a photograph like a murder or a work of art.

Photography is rather like those huge American department stores where you find all you want:  old master paintings, locomotives, playing cards, tempests, gardens, opera glasses, pretty girls.  But steer clear at all costs of the floorwalkers.  They are terrible chatterbox bores who have no idea what they are saying.

A photographer for the Daily Mirror said to me:  “The most beautiful photos I’ve ever taken were on a day I had forgotten my film.”

That photographer is a poet, perhaps, but quite certainly an imbecile.  The photographer’s personality?

Obviously each of them blows his nose in his own fashion.  But the most successful photographs are not those that required the most trouble.

That would be just too easy.

Carlo Rim in On the Snapshot

Comments are welcome! 

Q: How do you think your time in Bali will affect your work?

Barbara in her favorite sarong; photo by Donna Tang

Barbara in her favorite sarong; photo by Donna Tang

A: There is always a long gestation period as I reflect on the new experiences, sights, sounds, etc. after a trip. Bali is a fascinating place – the only Hindu outpost in the world’s most populous Muslim country – so I’m reading everything I can find. I’ve finished an historical novel, Love and Death in Bali, about the 1906 mass suicide of the royal family during the Dutch invasion. I’m slowly making my way through Bali: Sekala and Niskala, a densely packed book about the intricacies of Hinduism, rituals, and art, written with the help of our guide, Budi. In the short term I’m using more green pastels in my paintings. Amidst all of the tropical lushness, I must have seen thousands of shades of green. The volcano shapes in “Absence,” a pastel painting completed last week (see post of JUL 20), resulted from this trip. Other, more pronounced effects will probably show up later.