Blog Archives

Pearls from artists* # 331

Great Falls, VA

Great Falls, VA

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

And you should not let yourself be confused in your solitude by the fact that there is something in you that wants to break out of it.  This very wish will help you, if you use it quietly, and deliberately and like a tool, to spread out your solitude over wide country.  People have (with the help of conventions) oriented all their solutions toward the easy and toward the easiest side of the easy; but it is clear that we must hold to what is difficult; everything alive holds to it, everything in Nature grows and defends itself in its own way and is characteristically and spontaneously itself, seeks at all costs to be so and against all opposition.  We know little, but that we must hold to what is difficult is a certainty that will not forsake us; it is good to be solitary, for solitude is difficult; that something is difficult must be a reason the more for us to do it.           

Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet, Translation by M.D. Herter Norton

Comments are welcome!

Q: What advice to you have for younger artists who are just beginning their careers?

Barbara's studio

Barbara’s studio

A:  I have two pieces of advice:

  • Build a support network among your fellow artists, teachers, and friends.  It is tough to be an artist starting out.  Also, be sure to read plenty of books by and about artists.  All have experienced similar challenges.
  • Do whatever you must to keep working – no matter what!  Being an artist never really gets easier.  There are always new obstacles and you’ll discover solutions over time.

Comments are welcome!

 

Q: Do you have any unfinished pastel paintings?

Barbara's studio

Barbara’s studio

A:  It has been roughly 20 years since I started a painting that I couldn’t resolve and finish.  This may or may not be a good thing.  It could mean that I am not experimenting or pushing myself enough.  On the other hand, having worked as a professional artist for nearly thirty years, I am confident of my ability to think through and find solutions for finishing each painting, regardless of the difficulties encountered along the way.

Comments are welcome!       

Q: What do you do when you are between paintings?

Work in progress

Work in progress

A:  I would be at loose ends if I finished a pastel painting and didn’t have another one immediately available to work on.  It’s one reason I always have two paintings in progress.   Another is that when I get stuck on some technical problem, I can switch to the other painting.  Works in progress tend to interact and play off of each other.  As I am working on a second painting, solutions to problems I had on the first quickly become apparent.    

Comments are welcome!