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Pearls from artists* # 281

"Poker Face," soft pastel on sandpaper, 38" x 58"

“Poker Face,” soft pastel on sandpaper, 38″ x 58″

*an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Interviewer:  Do you think criticism helps any?

Capote: Before publication, and if provided by persons whose judgment you trust, yes, of course criticism helps.  But after something is published, all I want to hear is praise.  Anything less is a bore, and I’ll give you fifty dollars if you produced a writer who can honestly say he was ever helped by the prissy carpings and condescensions of reviewers.  I don’t mean to say  that none of the professional critics are worth paying attention to – but few of the good ones review on a regular basis.  Most of all, I believe in hardening yourself against opinion.  I’ve had, and continue to receive, my full share of abuse, some of it extremely personal, but it doesn’t faze me any more.  I can read the most outrageous libel about myself and never skip a pulsebeat.  And in this connection there is one piece of advice I strongly urge:  never demean yourself by talking back to a critic, never.  Write those letters to the editor in your head, but don’t put them on paper.       

Truman Capote in Writers at Work:  The Paris Review Interviews First Series, edited, and with an introduction by Malcolm Crowley

Comments are welcome!

Pearls from artists* # 249

Barbara's studio

Barbara’s studio

* an ongoing series of quotations – mostly from artists, to artists – that offers wisdom, inspiration, and advice for the sometimes lonely road we are on.

Interviewer:  Can a writer learn style?

Capote:  No, I don’t think that style is consciously arrived at, any more than one arrives at the color of one’s eyes.  After all, your style is you.  At the end the personality of  a writer  has so much to do with the work.  The personality has to be humanly there.  Personality is a debased word, I know, but it’s what I mean.  The writer’s individual humanity, his word or gesture towards the world, has to appear almost like a character that makes contact with the reader.  If the personality is vague or confused or merely literary, ca ne va pas.  Faulkner, Mc Cullers – they project their personality at once.

Truman Capote in Writers at Work:  The Paris Review Interviews First Series, edited, and with an introduction by Malcolm Crowley

Comments are welcome!